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Becoming a Midwife in Minnesota – MN

The estimated growth factor for this profession through 2018 is between 21% and 35%. Although we are about 8 years away from realizing the full potential of this growth, we do know that the Bureau of Labor Statistics recognizes a shortage of midwives nationwide.


Recent studies estimate that 81.9% of all newborns in Minnesota are being breastfed, which is much higher than the 75% of infants being breastfed on a national level. Women that breastfeed are much more likely to prefer natural methods of childbirth, without the use of epidural anesthesia or surgical intervention. In 2004, about 8.6% of births in Minnesota were handled by midwives, compared to 8% nationally.

Becoming a midwife in Minnesota requires dedication, patience, and an appreciation for the natural ability of a woman to deliver a child under natural conditions. Before you can begin seeking work in this field, your degree program requires that you complete both didactic and clinical training. Most of these clinical trials last between 4 and 10 months in order to meet the requirement for state licensure.

The Minnesota Board of Medical Practice requires that all midwives be licensed. In addition to education and training, you will need to have:

  • Certification from the North American Registry of Midwives (NARM).
  • Certification from the American Heart Association in cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Midwife Schools