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How to Become a Massage Therapist in Idaho - ID

Massage therapists in Idaho face a promising growth rate in a nationally growing field. It is considered a high demand occupation both nationally (20% growth rate), with an even higher rate in Idaho (23% increase between 2004 and 2014). The state of Idaho boasts a population of 1,429,096, ranking 39th in the U.S., but has the sixth fastest population growth rate. A growing field in a growing state has many positive advantages for those considering massage therapy certification in Idaho, including job security and good salary prospects. There are approximately 230 massage therapists in Idaho.

Most individuals holding Idaho massage therapy certification are employed in the following settings:  Personal care services (independent therapists who have their own space or go to their clients’ home), health practitioner offices (non-physicians; chiropractors or physical or occupational therapists), hotels, country clubs or fitness centers, and physicians’ offices.

Steps to become a Massage Therapist in Idaho

Once you complete training from an accredited program leading to Idaho massage therapy certification, you can become nationally certified through the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBMTB), which administers the National Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCETMB). The exam itself costs $225 and requires submission of an application, a background check and other documentation.

Although Idaho does not require massage therapists to have these credentials, it is possible, given the growth rate of the field within the state, that this may change in the future. NCBTMB certification indicates that a massage therapist has earned professional credentials.

National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB)
1901 S. Meyers Road Suite 240
Oakbrook Terrace, IL  60180-5243
(800) 296-0664
www.ncbtmb.org

Professional Organizations:

The American Massage Therapy Association (AMTA) exists to provide many benefits to its members, including advancement of the practice, promotion, cooperation, education and networking opportunities. Membership includes professional liability insurance, inclusion in the AMTA’s national locator service, and use of the AMTA Professional member logo. The AMTA is set up as a national organization with chapters in states.

To become a professional member of the AMTA, applicants must either graduate from a massage therapy training program (minimum of 500 in-class hours), or hold a current license from an AMTA-accepted city or state license, or be certified by the NCBTMB.

American Massage Therapy Association
Attn: Member Services
500 Davis Street, Suite 900
Evanston, IL 60201-4695
(877) 905-2700
(www.amtamassage.org)

Membership dues are $235, plus the Idaho state chapter fee of $25. The Idaho chapter holds local and state meetings and produces a quarterly newsletter containing information about massage therapy topics and therapists throughout the state.

AMTA – Idaho
445 Marjacq Avenue
Idaho Falls, ID 83401
www.amtaid.org

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