Medical Transcriptionist Certificate


Is there a national certificate to become registered as a medical transcriptionist?

Currently, credentialing is voluntary but makes for easier employment placement. However, those trying to get into the profession are finding it much more difficult to get a job without credentials. Those who graduate from an approved transcription program are

What are the credentialing exams like?

The exams consist of two parts. The first part includes 120 multiple-choice questions that test anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, disease processes, styles and standards, grammar and punctuation. The second part of the exam is a practical portion that involves transcribing excerpts of information and editing incorrect portions of excerpts. The exam generally takes three to four hours to complete.

Are there continuing education requirements in this field?

The registered medical transcriptionist (RMT) credential does not include continuing education requirements but the CMT credential does. The goal would be for most RMTs to sit for the CMT exam after they have met their requirement of having two years of hospital documentation experience. There is an RMT recredentialing course to maintain the RMT if after three years a person decides not to sit for the CMT.

To maintain the certified medical transcriptionist (CMT) credential, 30 or more continuing education credits are required within a three-year period. CMTs can earn continuing education through national, state/regional, and local educational conferences and symposia as well as through online courses, taking quizzes after reading credit-worthy articles in industry publications, and even watching videos through the Discovery Health Channel.

Learn more about medical transcription schools.

What professional organizations exist for this field?

The Association for Healthcare Documentation Integrity (AHDI) is the professional organization for medical transcriptionists. This organization sets standards for the profession by approving medical transcription education programs (there are currently 18 approved programs) and by offering a first and second level credentialing process (RMT and CMT). The association actively lobbies and advocates for the role of medical transcription in healthcare delivery and the electronic health records (EHR), sets standards of practice for the sector, and offers cutting-edge information, resources, and educational programming for both its members and the industry. Membership for the professional medical transcriptionist means access to all of these resources as well as the opportunity for networking with industry employers, vendors, colleagues, and educators.

Medical Transcriptionist Schools