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Medical Billing and Coding Education in Ohio - OH

Although Ohio has traditionally been known as the Buckeye State, more and more it is also becoming known as the “State of Perfect Balance.” A low cost of living, a strong commitment to education, abundant recreation and a government bent on attracting business makes an Ohio medical billing certificate an enticing professional credential. Medical billing and coding specialists, often known as medical records and health information technicians, along with other healthcare professionals, can find many opportunities here.

Ohio’s healthcare resources are outstanding. The annual ranking of America’s Best Hospitals by U.S. News & World Report consistently ranks the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio as one of the top five hospitals in the U.S. Other institutions ranked among the nation’s elite medical centers are the Ohio State James Cancer Hospital in Columbus, the Ohio State Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Solove Research Institute. The Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, University Hospital's Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital in Cleveland, Children's Hospital Cleveland Clinic and Nationwide Children's in Columbus are ranked among the top 20 pediatric hospitals in the U.S. In addition, 16 percent of all clinical trials conducted in the U.S. in 2008 were located in Ohio.

 

The fourth largest stem cell research organization in the U.S., the Center for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine (CSCRM) in Cleveland, Ohio, is comprised of researchers and clinicians from the Ohio State University, the Cleveland Clinic, Athersys Inc., University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University. Ongoing clinical trials are focused on helping patients with heart disease, cancer, genetic disorders, neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and stroke.
Additionally, Ohio has a strong biotechnology industry, with more than $2.5 billion in funding.  There are approximately 1,141 bioscience entities, including bioinformatics, pharmaceuticals, medical equipment, diagnostics and other health-related products.  Collectively they generate more than $146 billion and employ more than 1.2 million workers.

In light of the importance of healthcare in Ohio, according to the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Bureau of Labor Market Information, June 2009, medical records and health information technicians are one of the occupations with high employment prospects in Ohio, during 3rd quarters, 2008 – 2010.

2008 employment: 6,480
2010 forecast: 6,570
Changes in 3rd quarter, 2008 – 3rd quarter, 2010: 90
Total annual job openings: 202
Average wage, May 08: $15.29

Graduates with medical billing and coding certification in Ohio process and maintain patient medical records according to recognized standards, regulations and ethics set forth by health care systems and government agencies. Codes are assigned according to diagnosis and procedure for every patient. Although their services are utilized in hospitals and outpatient clinics, laboratories, long-term care facilities, physicians’ offices, insurance firms, public health departments, government agencies, and other healthcare settings, individuals working in this field typically do not interact with patients.


Medical Billing & Coding Schools