Texas Personal Trainer Schools - TX

Texas Personal Trainer Education

Many personal trainers are part-time workers who hold other jobs in different industries, according to the Texas Labor Market and Career Information Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. There are, however, opportunities for full-time employment with experience, and training through Texas personal training courses. Some personal trainer schools have begun offering courses in social media marketing and business development to help members stand out in the competitive marketplace.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has predicted that graduates of Texas personal training schools will have more opportunities for full-time employment in the next decade. Work for personal trainers is expected to increase by 27 percent – faster than other occupations – through 2016. Greater awareness of health concerns and an aging population eager to stay fit are contributing to greater demand for personal trainers. The Texas Workforce Commission identified 12,050 people employed as fitness trainers and aerobics instructors in 2008. The Texas Labor Market and Career Information Department estimates that there will be 500 annual openings for fitness trainers and aerobics instructors between 2006 and 2016.

Personal trainers motivate clients to improve physical fitness and overall health by creating and monitoring nutrition, exercise and weight-training programs. Texas is expected to see demand for personal trainers increase in the next decade as state officials and employers work to reverse troubling obesity trends. Houston, San Antonio and other Texas cities are routinely ranked near the top nationally for obesity rates. A Texas Comptroller study published in 2007 concluded that nearly two-thirds of the Lone Star State’s population was overweight or obese. These dubious distinctions, along with an aging population eager to stay healthy, have triggered a series of public campaigns to encourage Texans to live healthier lifestyles. Texans who are too busy to learn about nutrition science or start their own fitness regimens are hiring personal trainers to get into shape. Texas employers are also implementing wellness programs that utilize the skills of personal trainers to reduce healthcare expenses associated with obesity.

Source: http://www.window.state.tx.us/specialrpt/obesitycost/96 1248execsummary.pdf

Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos296.htm and Texas Workforce Commission/Texas Labor Market Career Information http://www.tracer2.com/cgi/dataanalysis/

Continuing Education

Most of the certifying organizations require personal trainers to be re-certified every two years to ensure competence for entry-level service. Certifying organizations typically require enrollment in continuing education courses that expand on entry-level courses. Through supplemental Texas personal training courses, successful personal trainers pursue additional certifications from multiple organizations to assist in career advancement. Personal trainers also must update CPR certification on a regular basis.

Through campus based and online programs, aspiring Personal Trainers in Houston, Dallas, Austin, Fort Worth, El Paso, Arlington, Corpus Christi, Plano, Laredo, Lubbock and Amarillo, Texas may be able to prepare themselves for the possibility of employment in some of the largest hospitals and healthcare facilities in the state including the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, Memorial Hermann Hospital, CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital and Baylor Medical Centers.

Personal Trainer Schools