Nursing Schools in Nebraska – NE | Colleges | Degree | Education

Nursing Schools in Nebraska – NE

Aspiring nurses would do well to plan for nursing careers in Nebraska as the state shows optimistic employment trends for nurses. Nebraska is likely to see an increase of over 11 percent in the employment of registered nurses (RNs), according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration. An average of 1,600 RN jobs are expected to be available annually. An aging population and an increasing emphasis on performing more complex procedures in outpatient clinics are some of the factors driving the demand for nurses in the state, says a recent article in Live Well Nebraska.

For an understanding of nursing qualifications and careers, the article Nursing Education, Schools and Career Overview may be useful. Below is a comprehensive overview of nursing degree programs in Nebraska along with useful information on financial aid programs, nursing licensure and nursing certification needed for a nursing career in Nebraska.

What nursing schools are there in Nebraska?

Most Nebraska nursing schools are regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. A few examples of Nebraska nursing schools are:

  • Bryan College of Health Sciences — offers Bachelor of Science (BSN) degree program as well as an RN-to-BSN program for licensed RNs with a diploma or associate degree in nursing. Those looking to specialize in a particular area for advanced practice roles can consider enrolling in Master of Science (MSN) degree program.
  • Creighton University — Students with a non-nursing baccalaureate degree can complete an accelerated BSN degree program in around 12 months from this university.
  • Nebraska Methodist College — LPNs with educational qualifications from state approved technical or vocational programs can train as RNs through LPN to BSN degree program available at this college.
  • Nebraska Wesleyan University — offers blended RN-to-BSN and MSN degree programs including a combination of face-to-face, online and hybrid class formats.

What financial aid can I get for nursing programs in Nebraska?

You can apply for a number of financial aid programs to support your nursing education in Nebraska. You could look up federal and state financial aid programs and also consider applying for nursing scholarships in Nebraska. Some noteworthy nursing scholarships in the state are:

  • American Legion Auxiliary Department of Nebraska Nurse's Scholarship — for Nebraska residents who may be veterans or connected to a veteran and may pursue a nursing degree program
  • Bill and Mary Russell Healthcare Scholarship — for students of nursing or another healthcare field enrolled in an approved nursing or healthcare program. Residents of Nemaha and Richardson counties in Nebraska and certain counties in other states that fall within the Mosaic Life Care Foundation service region could apply.
  • Velma Flies Anderson Scholarship — for senior-level students who are enrolled in an approved RN degree program and who have demonstrated academic and clinical excellence. Eligible applicants may include residents of Nemaha and Richardson counties in Nebraska and certain counties in other states that fall within the Mosaic Life Care Foundation service region.

What do I need to know about certifications in nursing in Nebraska?

Nursing certification in Nebraska may be granted by the Nebraska Board of Nursing. Advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) candidates with certification from one of the following Board approved national certifying bodies may be accepted:

  • American Nurses Credentialing Center
  • American Association of Critical Care Nurses
  • Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation
  • American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
  • American Nurses Credentialing Center
  • National Certification Corporation
  • Pediatric Nursing Certification Board
  • American Midwifery Certification Board
  • National Board of Certification and Recertification for Nurse Anesthetists

With suitable Nebraska nursing certifications, graduate degree holders who have passed the national licensure examination could qualify in one of four APRN roles -- nurse practitioner (NP), clinical nurse specialist (CNS), certified nurse midwife (CNM) and certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA). Eligible NPs may be granted prescriptive authority.

Do I need a nursing license in Nebraska? How do I apply for it?

You typically need a nursing license for a professional nursing career in Nebraska, for which you may need to pass the National Council of State Boards of Nursing Licensing Examination (NCLEX) to be eligible. When applying for licensure by examination, you may need to:

  • Submit an application along with an application fee
  • Provide evidence of age
  • Request your nursing school to submit official nursing degree transcripts directly to the Board
  • Register with Pearson Vue to appear for the NCLEX
  • Schedule and appear for the NCLEX once you receive an Authorization to Test (ATT)

Nebraska is a member of the enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC), an interstate agreement that allows nurses to use a single license to practice in any of the participating compact states. So, nurses from other compact states can use their current multistate licenses to practice nursing in Nebraska. However, nurses from non-compact states could be granted a Nebraska nursing license by endorsement.

Nursing licenses in Nebraska need to be renewed every two years. RNs may need to complete at least 20 contact hours of continuing education (CE) to be eligible for license renewal. APRNs might need to maintain current national certification in their specialty to be eligible for license renewal. NPs and CNSs could complete 40 hours of CE, with 10 hours in pharmacotherapeutics for retaining prescriptive authority. There may not be any CE requirements for NMs or CRNAs in Nebraska.

What can I do with a degree in nursing in Nebraska?

Data shows that opportunities for Nebraska nurses are likely to increase across the state. The Northwest Nebraska nonmetropolitan area ranks among the top nonmetropolitan areas with the highest concentration of jobs for RNs, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Furthermore, a recent report from the Nebraska Center for Nursing says that the Omaha consortium and Lincoln metropolitan statistical area could have the most open positions for nurses in 2025.

The tables that follow might give you a general idea of nursing careers in Nebraska based on projected job growth, salaries and employment rates.

CareerTotal EmploymentStatewide Projected Job Growth Rate
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses5,56014.8%
Nurse Anesthetists38011.2%
Nurse Practitioners1,19021.9%
Nursing Assistants13,72012.2%
Registered Nurses23,80011.6%
2019 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2018-28 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov.

Sources:

  • American Legion Auxiliary - Department of Nebraska, Unit Instruction Sheet for Processing Scholarship Applications, on the Internet at https://nebraskalegionaux.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/NURSES-SCHOLARSHIP-APPLICATION.pdf (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Bryan College of Health Sciences, on the Internet at https://www.bryanhealthcollege.edu/bcohs/ (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Clarkson College, on the Internet at https://www.clarksoncollege.edu/ (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • College of Saint Mary, on the Internet at https://www.csm.edu/ (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Creighton University, on the Internet at https://gradschool.creighton.edu/ (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Live Well Nebraska, "Nebraska nursing shortage expected to rise 34% by 2025. What hospitals are doing to keep up", published in September 2019, on the Internet at https://www.omaha.com/livewellnebraska/nebraska-nursing-shortage-expected-to-rise-by-what-hospitals-are/article_7e4c46b9-3c9d-56b2-9a84-44a370e9d35b.html#anchor_item_8 (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Mosaic Life Care Foundation, Bill and Mary Russell Healthcare Scholarship, on the Internet at https://www.mlcfoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/BMR-2020-application-and-check-list.pdf (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Mosaic Life Care Foundation, Velma Flies Anderson Scholarship, on the Internet at https://www.mlcfoundation.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Final-Velma-Flies-Anderson-Scholarship-Guidelines-and-Application-2020.pdf (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • National Council of State Boards of Nursing, "Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC) Implemented Jan. 19, 2018", News release published on 19 January, 2018, on the Internet at https://www.ncsbn.org/11945.htm (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Nebraska Board of Nursing, on the Internet at http://dhhs.ne.gov/licensure/Pages/Nurse-Licensing.aspx (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Nebraska Center for Nursing, 2017-2018 Biennial Report, on the Internet at https://center4nursing.nebraska.gov/sites/center4nursing.nebraska.gov/files/doc/CFN%20-%20BIENNIAL%20REPORT%202018%20-%20FINAL_0.pdf (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Nebraska Legion Auxiliary, on the Internet at https://nebraskalegionaux.net/scholarships/ (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Nebraska Methodist College, on the Internet at https://www.methodistcollege.edu/ (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Nebraska Wesleyan University, on the Internet at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/ (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • Projections Central - State Occupational Projections, Long Term, Occupational Projections (2016-2026), on the Internet at https://projectionscentral.com/Projections/LongTerm (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
  • U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Employment Statistics, Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2018, Registered Nurses, on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291141.htm (accessed on 7 January, 2020)
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